Introduction

Fertility is something that most take for granted, for some however fertility issues can mean that having a child is difficult or impossible without help from a donor.

The Donor Programme Team will support you through the process every step of the way and are happy to answer any queries you have.

Further Information

If you have any questions please do not hesitate to contact the Donor Programme Team at gram.afcdonation@nhs.scot

You may also find the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority (HFEA) website useful. www.hfea.gov.uk.

Click here for more information on costs , NHS criteria or referral.

Egg Recipient

Treatment using donated eggs or embryos may be required if you have experienced premature menopause, are at risk of passing on a chromosomal abnormality to a child, have lost the use of your ovaries due to disease, surgery or the treatment of cancer, have had failed fertility treatment due to low ovarian reserve or egg quality issues.

After initial discussion with a member of the medical team and referral for this treatment, you will join the waiting list. The maximum age at which you can be accepted on to the waiting list is up until your 40th birthday for NHS funded patients and up to your 41st birthday for self-funded patients. The current waiting list for being offered a donor is 12-15 months but could be longer or shorter depending on the availability of donors. However, we aim to complete any treatment by the patients 45th birthday. Following referral, an information video regarding the process which explains all aspects of this treatment is sent to you. Thereafter there will be an opportunity for all implications to be explored with our Independent Counsellor and clinic appointment will be organised for discussion.

An egg recipient will undergo treatment in preparation to receive embryos created from donated eggs from a fresh donor cycle or donor egg bank. Donated eggs are fertilised using the male partners sperm or sperm from a donor as required.

Potential parents may request non-identifying information about the donor. Children born as a result of donation can request to find out non-identifying information when they reach the age of sixteen and identifying information when they reach the age of eighteen from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority.

Donors can only find the number of children who have been born as a result of their donation and where applicable the sex and year of birth. They do not have the legal right of access to or, parental or financial responsibility for, any children born as a result of their donations.

BBC News article - 'DNA testing, sperm donor anonymity and me' 24 Jan 2020

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Sperm Recipient

Treatment using donated sperm may be required due to low sperm count, if there is a risk of passing on a chromosomal abnormality to a child, or due to treatment of cancer or for single women or same sex couples who are considering family.

After initial discussion with a member of the medical team and referral for this treatment, you will join the waiting list. The maximum age at which you can be accepted on to the waiting list is up to your 45th birthday. The current waiting list for being offered a donor is 3-6 months but could be longer or shorter depending on the availability of donors. Following referral, an information video regarding the process which explains all aspects of this treatment is sent to you. Thereafter there will be an opportunity for all implications to be explored with our Independent Counsellor and clinic appointment will be organised for discussion.

A blood test will be taken to check for ovulation and a further test to check the fallopian tubes are open. If you are ovulating and the tubes are open, treatment can be undertaken in a natural cycle using urinary ovulation detection kits. If this is not successful, or if you are not ovulating, we can provide medication to assist ovulation.

Potential parents may request non-identifying information about the donor. Children born as a result of a donation can request to find out non-identifying information when they reach the age of sixteen and identifying information when they reach the age of eighteen from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority.

Donors can only find the number of children who have been born as a result of their donation and where applicable the sex and year of birth. They do not have the legal right of access to or, parental or financial responsibility for, any children born as a result of their donations.

The centre works according to the HFEA regulations to maintain the donor anonymity. However, availability of DNA -testing from commercial companies can potentially result in breach of this anonymity as highlighted in this BBC News short video clip - 'DNA testing, sperm donor anonymity and me' 24 Jan 2020

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Embryo Recipient

Treatment using donated embryos may be considered if a patient requires egg and sperm donation. Patients that have previously had treatment and have completed their family or declined further treatment, and have embryos in cryostorage, can choose to donate their remaining embryos.

An initial consultation will take place with a member of the Donor Programme Team, the treatment is fully explained and thereafter implications can be discussed with the Independent Counsellor.

Embryo donors are registered with the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority as an egg and a sperm donor. They will undergo screening tests before being accepted as embryo donors.

Potential parents may request non-identifying information about the donors. Offspring born as a result of a donation can request to find out the identity of the donor when they reach the age of eighteen from the Human Fertilisation and Embryology Authority.

Donors can only find out if any children have been born as a result of their donation and where applicable the sex and year of birth. They do not have the legal right of access to or, parental or financial responsibility for, any children born as a result of their donations.

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